Monthly Archive:: April 2013

SAR Exposure From UHF RFID Reader in Adult, Child, Pregnant Woman, and Fetus Anatomical Models Abstract The spread of radio frequency identification (RFID) devices in ubiquitous applications without their simultaneous exposure assessment could give rise to public concerns about their potential adverse health effects. Among the various RFID system categories, the ultra high frequency (UHF) RFID systems have recently started to be widely used in many applications. This study addresses a computational exposure assessment of the electromagnetic radiation generated by a realistic UHF RFID reader, quantifying the exposure levels in different exposure scenarios and subjects (two adults, four children, and [&hellip

Read More...

There are 244 full-body “backscatter” X-ray scanners in use at 36 airports in the United States. They operate almost nonstop, according to the Transportation Security Administration. Other airports use millimeter wave scanners, which look like glass telephone booths and do not use radiation, or metal detectors.” NYT August 6, 2012, 5:26 pm X-Ray Scans at Airports Leave Lingering Worries By RONI CARYN RABIN Even before she was pregnant, Yolanda Marin-Czachor tried to avoid the full-body X-ray scanners that security officers use to screen airport passengers. Now she’s adamant about it: She’ll take a radiation-free pat-down instead any day. “I had two miscarriages before this pregnancy,” Ms. Marin-Czachor, [&hellip

Read More...

Comment Period Ends June 24th 2013 The Transportation Security Administration, under a court order issued nearly two years ago, has finally been soliciting public comments about its use of body scanners and pat-downs at airports. More than 500 people have offered their thoughts — overwhelmingly negative — so far. The deadline for submitting comments is June 24. The security agency was required by federal law to seek public comment before using the scanners for primary screening at airport checkpoints. In 2010, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, an advocacy group, sued to block the use of body scanners, arguing that the machines [&hellip

Read More...

Dr Neil Cherry (1946 -2003) held the position of Associate Professor of Environmental Health at Lincoln University, New Zealand. (Assoc Prof (NZ) = Full Prof (US)). Professor Cherry had listened to these concerns of the community and spent many years and a great deal of his own salary income to travel around the world visiting universities and laboratories to collect the published papers and discuss as much as possible with the original researchers to make sure his evidence and conclusions are closely correct. It is highly likely that Professor Cherry was the first Environmental Health scientist in the world to [&hellip

Read More...